17th April 2014

Chat reblogged from Stuff and Thangs with 108,201 notes

  • me: does this look better one pixel to the left or one pixel to the right
  • me: I can't decide between these two incredibly similar colors
  • me: should this be on overlay or soft light
  • me: 75% OR 74% OPACITY

Tagged: LOLGPOYartist

Source: purepazaak

17th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Planet Leporidae with 620 notes

neuromorphogenesis:

Fact or fiction? Common myths about autism explained

April is Autism Awareness Month. Is your knowledge of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) up-to-date?

Dr. Jeffrey Skowron, Regional Clinical Director for Autism Intervention Specialists in Worcester says there are many myths around autism, but they largely fall into two camps: treatment and causes.

Myth: Vaccines cause autism

This is one of the biggest myths about autism. This idea, based on research that has since been debunked and retracted by medical journals, took off after celebrity Jenny McCarthy claimed her son had autism because of vaccines.

“There’s no credible scientific evidence that autism is related to vaccines in any way,” said Dr. Skowron.

So why does the myth continue to have momentum? Dr. Skowron says that around the time parents start to see signs of autism in their children is around the time when they receive multiple vaccines.

“They will say that their child is having issues with certain aspects of their development, and they ask why is he or she acting this way. It’s just a coincidence that the two events—vaccinations and developing social skills—happen at this time. But frankly it’s hard for parents to diagnose social skills in a six-month-old because they really aren’t having social interactions yet.”

Myth: Autism is a disease

Autism is not a disease, it’s a collection of behaviors or symptoms, which makes it a syndrome.

“We aren’t sure of the underlying pathology or physical issues related to it. Although there is more evidence,” said Dr. Skowron. “There are several different presentations of the behavior we call autism. Most likely it’s a disorder of the brain.”

Because children display the signs of autism shortly after birth, researchers believe there’s a large genetic component which Dr. Skowron says the prevalence of autism with siblings and twins supports. There is a 90 percent likelihood that if one twin has autism, the other will too according to the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Between siblings, there is a five percent chance that they will both be diagnosed with autism.

Myth: More people have autism than ever

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that 1 in 68 children are diagnosed with autism. A decade ago, the rate was 1 in 150.

But while Dr. Skowron admits that it’s hard to say why those rates are higher, he says it’s not simply an increased prevalence of autism. “It’s a myth to say that more people have autism,” he said.

“It could be that we’re just finding it more often. Families are looking for the signs more, and they have better access to pediatricians, clinicians, and psychologists that are better able to diagnose them,” he said. “What you should really be saying is that more people are diagnosed with autism today than ever before.”

Myth: Treatments turn kids into robots

Some say that behavioral therapy, the recommended treatment for autism, is highly impersonal, which Dr. Skowron said “is simply not true.”

“People say it turns kids into robots,” said Dr. Skowron, who has been working in applied behavioral analysis for 20 years. “It seems very personal to me. Based on the needs of the kids you form a strong bond with the person. The families play a big role in the treatment, and they can have a great affect on the treatment of the child.”

Doctors typically prescribe antipsychotic medications to treat severe symptoms of autism, which can include anxiety, depression, or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

“The best and most effective treatment for autism is applied behavior analysis,” said Dr. Skowron. “There is scientific evidence showing the effectiveness of treating autism this way. Any other methods just don’t have the same body of research toward them.”

Myth: There’s a cure for autism

There is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, according to the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, although there is research going toward this effort. While treatment can be very effective, the social deficits and symptoms are there throughout the person’s life.

“They can learn to compensate with in very effective ways to the point that other people might not even know,” said Dr. Skowron. “But whatever physical problems are in the brain of that person, those will remain throughout the person’s life. So people have to learn ways around that.”

Because of the varying degrees of autism, while some may require a supportive environment, people with autism can successfully live independently.

Myth: People with autism can’t love

Because those who are autistic can have an impaired ability to make friends or carry on a conversation, a common myth is that people with autism can’t love or show emotions such as empathy.

“They may have deficits in social interaction skills and in conveying those emotions to other people, but those emotions are there,” said Dr. Skowron. “There are some people that say if your child is diagnosed with autism, so they can never have a relationship—well that’s just not true. People with autism can have relationships, spouses, girlfriends, and boyfriends. There’s a variety and spectrum of abilities and deficits associated with autism, and people can display these to varying degrees.”

People with autism can go on to have jobs, relationships, and families with effective intervention therapies.

Myth: Foods can cause autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is largely a genetic disorder, and although researchers say environment does play a role in early development, there is not substantial medical evidence finding a relationship between autism and food. Despite this, some families try nutritional therapies like gluten-free diets to treat autism.

Children with autism who improve their behavior as a result of eliminating certain foods from their diets likely have a food allergy, said Dr. Skowron.

“For instance, if a child has a lactose allergy, then drinking milk will make them feel bad and it will probably interfere with their treatment or education, but it’s not because of the milk exacerbating the condition of autism, it’s because drinking the milk makes them feel bad because they’re allergic. Some parents think that a gluten-free diet helps their child with autism, and it may make the child feel better, but it’s not because the wheat or gluten causes autism, it’s because the child has a wheat allergy.”

Doctors recommend that any families following one of the controversial nutritional therapies should be sure to consult a nutritionist and closely follow the child’s nutritional status.

Get the facts:

“Things like treatment involving diet or avoiding vaccinations, avoiding certain foods, those just don’t have credible scientific evidence,” said Dr. Skowron. The true key to treating autism? He says start behavioral therapy intensively when the child is very young.

“If it’s started early, and we’re talking when they’re toddlers, we can see even in the most extreme cases there are huge differences by the time the child is a teenager depending on their function needs.”

To find resources for your family and friends, or to learn more about autism, find more information at:

The Autism Resource Center

Autism Speaks

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Mass ABA

Image1: A boy plays with seeds during therapy at the therapy and development center for autistic kids in the Asociacion Guatemalteca por el Autismo, or Guatemalan Association for Autism, building in Guatemala City March 13, 2014.The center is the only one in the country that specifically conducts programs for autistic children, according to the association.

Image2: Alexander Prentice, 5, of Burton, Mich., smiles as he searches for items at the bottom of a sand bin in the reinforcement room, which allows technicians to work with children on building on skill sets at Genesee Health System’s new Children’s Autism Center on Jan. 16, 2014 in Flint.

Tagged: Autism

Source: Boston.com

17th April 2014

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Tagged: sad thingsmy life

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Land of Storm and Candles with 85,883 notes

wessasaurus-rex:

1nflatable-hammers:

Thought I’d give this a go.

I’ll take twenty of these 

Tagged: LOL

Source: 1nflatable-hammers

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Planet Leporidae with 365,006 notes

dreamofflight:

letslivelikejackandsally:

we’re all getting arrested for this

I have to believe the President would die laughing at these.

Tagged: LOLGIFsGIF setObamawebcam

Source: pleatedjeans

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Planet Leporidae with 12 notes

didsomebodysaybottomsam:

The Izu Islands of Japan

     The Izu Island chain consists of twelve small land masses off the south-eastern coast of Japan, though only nine are inhabited. The largest island, Oshima, was formed by a still active volcano dubbed Mt. Mihara. Large scale eruptions in the mid to late 1900’s caused massive amounts of the poisonous gas sulfur to be released into the air.

     For many years afterward, sulfur continued to leak through underground vents surrounding the volcano, making the island nearly uninhabitable. Scientists were curious as to the affects of prolonged contact to the noxious gas on human life, so they relocated to Oshima. They payed the locals a small sum of money to stay on the island indefinitely to determine the affects of the sulfur, and most agreed.

     They were given gas masks that had to be worn at all times, even in the house. On occasion air raid sirens would sound, alerting the citizens to lethally high amounts of sulfur in the air. When this happened, the people would either hide in underground bunkers or stay inside their well insulated homes to wait it out. To go outside without a gas mask on a normal day meant, at the least, chronic vomiting and intense periods of vertigo, but to go out on a day the sirens went off would mean a slow and agonizing death.

Tagged: gas mask

Source: didsomebodysaybottomsam

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from I Don't Even Know. with 238,493 notes

captain-mycaptain:

apushinthewrongdirection:

teacupsandcyanide:

stacysdad:

so no one told you life was gonna be this way

your blog’s a joke you’re broke your otp is gay

it’s like you’re always just stuck waiting here

for a tv show that’s not been on for months, or even for years

but, tumblr’s here for youuu, when the tears start to fall

tumblr’s here for youu, like no website before

tumblr’s here for you, ‘cause you’ve got nothing else to do

image

Tagged: LOLFriendsTumblr

Source: stacysdad

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from I Don't Even Know. with 43,688 notes

princepreppie:

rebornica:

Video Game Consoles!

Please do not remove my credit/comment

OMFG THAT IS SOME AWESOME SHIT

Tagged: LOOKIT THAT CUTE GAMECUBErobotrobotsartvideogames

Source: rebornica

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Stuff and Thangs with 58,349 notes

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

Tagged: writingemotion

Source: amandaonwriting

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from THE ATRIUM with 201 notes

Tagged: Deadmau5photo

Source: xraptorz